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Golf Tournament to benefit culinary education nonprofit

>Click to watch coverage on Hawaii News Now HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) -The nineteenth Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation Charity Golf Tournament will be held on Tuesday, April 11 at the Kapolei Golf Course.  Tournament proceeds benefit the culinary nonprofit dedicated to culinary education in Hawaii. The tournament begins with buffet lunch, a noon shotgun start and concludes with an awards banquet prepared by local chefs and restaurants. The tournament raffle features thousands of dollars in prizes including neighbor island trips, state of the art electronics and luxury gift certificates. Golfers have numerous chances to win prizes in the $20,000 hole-in-one, closest to the pin, putting, chipping and driving competitions. The tournament is the Foundation's key fundraiser, allowing the organization to sponsor educational culinary projects throughout the Islands. Programming includes Center of the Plate workshops led by award-winning Hawaii chefs and visiting Master Chef events.  The Foundation supported programs bring local, mainland and international chefs into the classroom to present intensive learning experiences for culinary/chef instructors and local culinary students. The Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation, founded in 1998, recognizes the significant contribution of the culinary industry to Hawaii's economy and is dedicated to championing Hawaii's unique culinary traditions.  An advisory committee comprised of prominent members of the restaurant and hospitality industry plus key leaders in the culinary field coordinates educational experiences for chef/instructors and culinary students. The HCEF Board encourages the community to sign up and support this culinary fundraiser.  Cost for a team of three players is $1,400. To register, visit www.hawaiiculinaryfoundation.org  or call (808) 941-9088. Copyright 2017.  Hawaii News Now.  All Rights Reserved.

Golf, dine to help chefs help students

COURTESY HAWAII CULINARY EDUCATION FOUNDATION The Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation hosts its 19th annual golf tournament April 11 at the Kapolei Golf Course. All proceeds benefit culinary education in Hawaii. The Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation hosts its 19th annual golf tournament April 11 at the Kapolei Golf Course. The foundation sponsors programs for Hawaii’s high school and college culinary students, bringing local, mainland and international chefs into the classroom to share cutting-edge knowledge and techniques. The golf tournament, the group’s key fundraiser, kicks off with a buffet lunch, then offers participants the chance to win prizes and enter raffles. Cost for a team of three is $1,400. All proceeds benefit culinary education in Hawaii. Visit hawaiiculinaryfoundation.org. This week, enjoy recipes from the foundation’s guest instructors. Sauteed Mahimahi on Zucchini Noodles Chef George Mavrothalassitis, Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation board member 1 medium zucchini, ends removed 2 cups ice 1-1/4 cups salted water, divided 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 1 pound mahimahi, center cut, cut into 2 portions Sea salt, to taste 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, divided Juice of 1/2 lemon Cut zucchini lengthwise into 1/4-inch slices, discarding core. Cut slices lengthwise into 1/4-inch strips. Fill a mixing bowl with 2 cups ice and 1/2 cup salted water. Place another bowl on top of ice. In a saucepan, bring remaining 3/4 cup salted water to boil. Add garlic and zucchini; cook 2 minutes. Remove to bowl on top of ice, stirring to accelerate cooling. Reserve cooking water. Season fish with salt. In a nonstick frying pan, add 2 tablespoons olive oil and place fish in pan, skin side down. Turn on heat and cook fish, turning once. Remove from pan. Add lemon juice and reserved cooking liquid to pan; bring to boil. Add remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and zucchini; cook 1 minute. Taste and adjust seasonings. Place zucchini on 2 serving plates along with cooking juices. Top with mahimahi. Serve with steamed white or basmati rice. Serves 2. Approximate nutritional analysis, per serving (not including salt to season fish): 470 calories, 30 g total fat, 4.5 g saturated fat, 165 mg cholesterol, 500 mg sodium, 5 g carbohydrate, 1 g fiber, 3 g sugar, 43 g protein Brined & Roasted Chicken Chef Jackie Lau, culinary consultant 1 whole chicken, giblets removed, rinsed Fresh thyme and parsley sprigs 1 cup cold butter Olive oil, for basting Salt and pepper, to taste >> Brine: 2 quarts cold water 1/2 cup sugar 2 tablespoons salt 2 tablespoons garlic salt 1 tablespoon celery salt 1 tablespoon white pepper 1 tablespoon dry thyme 1 ounce onion powder >> Mirepoix (vegetable mix): 2 stalks celery, roughly chopped 2 carrots, roughly chopped 1 onion, roughly chopped Combine brine ingredients in large bowl; mix well. Immerse chicken in brine and soak, covered, in refrigerator for 24 hours. Heat oven to 300 degrees. Remove chicken from brine and pat dry with paper towels. Place thyme and parsley sprigs with butter in cavity. Place mirepoix in shallow roasting pan. Place chicken on top, breast side up. Brush skin with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast 2 hours, basting every half hour. Remove from oven and let rest about 10 minutes before serving. Serves 6. Approximate nutritional analysis, per serving (includes 1 tablespoon oil for basting and not including salt to taste): 840 calories, 68 g total fat, 30 g saturated fat, 245 mg cholesterol, greater than 2,000 mg sodium, 16 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 11 g sugar, 39 g protein

Popular chefs share cooking chops with local students

Some of Maui’s popular chefs are sharing their star status and knowledge with Maui high school students in an effort to inspire a future wave of culinary talent on the Valley Isle. Lanai City-raised chef Adam Tabura, who won the Food Network’s “Great Food Truck Race,” was recently at King Kekaulike High School, where he mentored 160 students over two days. “We talk about them mostly, what they want to do, but hopefully I’ve inspired them,” Tabura said, who taught the students how to make Hollandaise sauce last month while he was on the island for business and promoting his new products and cookbook. Tabura added that even if the students don’t want to be chefs, he is there to give guidance. Tabura is part of the Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation’s High School Chef Mentoring program. On Maui, he is joined by three other chefs mentoring at high schools: Ryan Luckey of Leilani’s on the Beach, at Lahainaluna High; Kyle Kawakami of Maui Fresh Streatery food truck, at Maui High; and Tylun Pang of Fairmont Kea Lani, Maui, at Baldwin High.

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Celebrated chef shares his story

Credit: Honolulu Star Advertiser The hottest food trend on the mainland right now is something we in Hawaii have taken for granted for generations: poke. Chef Sam Choy hopes it’s not just a flash in the pan, he told culinary educators at a workshop. Not because he just opened Sam Choy’s Poke to the Max in Seattle after finding success with food trucks there, but because, as he said, “it’s a true taste of Hawaii.” His Seattle restaurant brings in 1,000 pounds of ahi each week from Hawaii, Choy said. The Hawai‘i Culinary Education Foundation staged the workshop at ChefZone on Thursday to give high school and community college culinary teachers insights into Choy’s career journey. The educators got to see a demonstration of classic and contemporary poke dishes, and watched the chef prepare a dish from a box of mystery ingredients, among other things.

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Golf tournament to benefit culinary non-profit

The eighteenth Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation Charity Golf Tournament will be held on Monday, April 11, 2016 at the Kapolei Golf Course. Tournament proceeds benefit the culinary nonprofit dedicated to culinary education in Hawaii.

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Let’s Talk Food: Chef with Hilo roots

Chef Jon Matsubara, culinary executive director for Bloomingdale’s at Ala Moana Center in Honolulu, has roots in Hilo.

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Seattle chef – Tom Douglas puts veggies front and center

What’s the difference between “hard char” and “burnt”? Burnt is a mistake, while a nicely charred vegetable is the product of a deliberate act that caramelizes the natural sugars to produce a bittersweetness. A vegetable like that can take the center of a $15 plate in a restaurant like Tom Douglas’ new Carlile Room in downtown Seattle. “It’s hard to get the idea of ‘hard char’ across so you don’t feel freaky about it,” Douglas said Monday as he showed off a slice of pineapple bearing a solid charred crust. Read More >>

Dumpling making, All Day Wong

Chef Lee Anne Wong said cooks are just craftsmen. Television makes them famous. One of the stars on the public television series, “Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking,” spent Tuesday morning with Kauai Community College culinary arts students. “It’s really good to have some of these (well-known) chefs to come and teach us,” said Angelito Roslin, a KCC student. “It shows us that we can achieve things we never would have thought we could.” Read more >>

Street-dish recipes provide head start on annual event

Take your taste buds on a tantalizing adventure through the streets of India at the Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation’s annual benefit

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Chef Garg to prepare a lineup of Indian street fare

The four regions of India each have their own version of classic street foods, and within those regions the various states present their own variations, with individual cooks and families adding their own touches to the dishes, chef Vikram Garg said.

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Cooking Indian cuisine requires know-how about spices

In India, people eat four meals a day, said Vikram Garg, executive chef of the Halekulani, who was born and raised in India. “Breakfast is eaten early, lunch is served by noon and in the evening there’s a huge culture of going out and eating. Then there’s a late-night supper,” he said. All this chowing down has created a long tradition of street food, presented at open stands that offer one or two quick-prep items, ideal for snacking, a grab-and-go lunch for a busy businessman, or that late supper. These are the specialty of the cook, who’s often executing a family recipe passed down generationally, or after apprenticing with a master cook. Amazingly, “nothing is written down,” said Garg. “In fact, many of these cooks don’t read or write.” The chef is presenting some of those delicious morsels — from kebabs and chaat to vindaloo and uttapam (see the sidebar for descriptions) of various regions of India— at a benefit dinner Jan. 31 for the Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation. The grazing dinner, with separate food stations offering dishes, will reflect the concept of street food in India. Garg, 45, spent some 20 years creating gourmet food across the globe, in such locales as Dubai and the Caribbean as well as both coasts of the U.S., before arriving in Hawaii. Yet he is not formally trained in Indian cooking. “There is no school in the world that teaches Indian cuisine,” he said. After training to become a chef, “in Indian kitchens I cooked French cuisine.” In contrast, with no recipes to guide a student, learning to cook Indian food means paying close attention, with both eyes and taste buds. “You learn by technique and tasting. You watch and taste and taste,” said Garg. A steep level of knowledge of spices is required for the successful Indian cook, from quality and varieties of individual spices to blending them. This involves particular proportions and cooking temperatures to achieve specific scents, flavors and textures. “It’s like choosing a perfume and how it interacts with your body chemistry,” said the chef. “It’s about how the mixed spices interact with your palate.” The operative word here is balance. “There’s a misconception that Indian food is spicy. It is, sometimes, but it still must be balanced. The tongue should be able to taste each spice,” he said. “It’s not about the heat, but about the nose and the palate.” Read More >>

Hawaii Culinary Education Foundation Golf Tournament

Midweek article on 17th annual Charity Golf Tournament at Kapolei Golf Coursehosted by Hawaii Culinary Foundation. Read Midweek article here >>

Leilani’s on the Beach mentors Maui culinary students

Two first-year students of the Maui Culinary Academy were recently hosted by Leilani's on the Beach for two full days working closely with Executive Chef Ryan Luckey. Read More >>

Ladies vs Gents: Whose cuisine will reign supreme?

So MW Restaurant is putting together a benefit dinner with a male vs. female lineup of culinary superstars. Which is heart-stopping enough (I know who I’m putting my money on), but I wanted to know more. “It all started because Lee Anne wanted to do a girls dinner, so last month we did one with Les Dames d’Escoffiers,” MW’s Michelle Karr-Ueoka says. >> Read more here

Chefs visit schools to inspire culinary students

All eyes were glued to Ronnie Capitle's deft hands as he anchored paper-thin slices of beets on a toothpick, twirling it as he went along to create a vivid vegetable rose in less than a minute. The same can be done with other produce, he said, demonstrating next with slices of a yellow-fleshed sweet potato. Capitle's mesmerizing handiwork kept his audience glued to his every word, his work punctuating his message: Excellence takes dedication, practice and patience. Read more >>